Forest Park Miniature Railroad



Miniature Reflections

Part Two

by


Theo Gammel
©Gammel Associates



Theo Ledel Laying Out Train Theo Ledel in a picture taken in the fall of 1958 while he was laying out the route for the Forest Park Miniature Railroad. ©2009 Gammel Associates
Road crew and Bill Hames Road crew working on the right-of-way of the Forest Park Miniature Railroad in April 1959. The gentleman in the stetson wearing the dark suit is Bill Hames; the gentleman in the background walking toward the camera is Lloyd Sherwood. ©2009 Gammel Associates
Road crew and Bill Hames Road crew working on the grade crossing across what will eventually become Colonial Parkway. The dark suit with the stetson is Bill Hames. The hill in the background is the approach to the Truss Bridge over the Clear Fork of the Trinity River. The bridge in the backgound is University Drive where it crossed the Trinity River before the U.S. Corps of Engineers rechanneled it. ©2009 Gammel Associates
Truss Bridge The Truss Bridge from the University Drive bridge after the Truss Bridge was fitted into place on its piers in May 1959. If you look closely, the lettering on the bridge reads "HA HA." Whether this was some kind of comment or some one's initials has never been revealed. ©2009 Gammel Associates
Truss Bridge The Truss Bridge under construction from the north side of the Clear Fork of the Trinity River in May 1959. ©2009 Gammel Associates
Truss Bridge The Truss Bridge under construction from the south side of the Clear Fork of the Trinity River in May 1959. ©2009 Gammel Associates
Truss Bridge A closeup of the Truss Bridge north abutment in May 1959 as the bridge was under construction. ©2009 Gammel Associates
Truss Bridge The Truss Bridge next to the University Drive bridge in April 1959 after its construction was completed. ©2009 Gammel Associates

The sign reads:

Trinity River Bridge
For
World's Longest Miniature Railroad
Forest Park     Fort Worth, Texas
W.H. Hames, Owner

J. R. Wadell, Jr. Engineer & Contractor * Welding Specialties Co. Associates
W. E. Lanford Concrete Construction
Maxwell Steel Div., Creamer Industries-Structural Steel Fabrication & Erection
Brooks Drilling Co.-Foundation Drilling
Road Crew Two of the road crew working on the right-of-way in April 1959. The truck in the background carried ties, rail, tools, and spikes for use on the right-of-way. ©2009 Gammel Associates
Lloyd Sherwood and Bill Hames While road crew gauge the right-of-way Lloyd Sherwood watches the camera, and Bill Hames sees something interesting outside the camera's field of vision in April 1959. ©2009 Gammel Associates
Forest Park Depot Turnaround The beginning of the turnaround loop at the Forest Park Depot in April 1959 before the grade crossing was laid on the way to the Truss Bridge. The rail to the left led to the tunnel the inbound train went through on its way to the depot. ©2009 Gammel Associates
Original Depot The orginal Forest Park Depot in June 1959 when the Forest Park Miniature Railroad opened to the public. Notice that the ticket office is a ticket box and the sign proclaiming the Forest Park Miniature Railroad the longest miniature train ride in the world is not yet on the top of the Forest Park Depot. ©2009 Gammel Associates
Original Depot The Forest Park Depot in late June 1959 after the ticket office and the sign declaring the Forest Park Miniature Railroad the longest miniature train in the world were added. This earned the Forest Park Miniature Railroad a listing in the Guinness Book of World Records, but the title did not last long as other miniature railroads quickly built longer routes. ©2009 Gammel Associates
Theo Ledel. Theo Ledel in his conductor's uniform at the Forest Park Depot in June 1959. ©2009 Gammel Associates
Forest Park Miniture Railroad In a lighter moment in June 1959. Theo Ledel (with broom) pretends to swat one of the train crew. The three men in the backgroud are (from left to right) Clarence Holland (engineer), Bill Hames (owner of the Forest Park Miniature Railroad), and Duncan Finlayson (Alan Herschell representative). The two crewmen next to the G-16 coach are checking the air brakes. ©2009 Gammel Associates
Forest Park Miniture Railroad The Forest Park Depot filled with waiting passengers in June 1959. ©2009 Gammel Associates
Jean Conlin The flagman, Jean Conlin, assigned to traffic control at an incomplete grade crossing in Forest Park. Only one flashing-crossing signal was installed, and there was yet no electricity to power the signals at this location when the Forest Park Miniature Railroad opened to the public on 12 June 1959. ©2009 Gammel Associates
G-16 The G-16, with Lloyd Sherwood as engineer, making its way down the right-of-way. ©2009 Gammel Associates
G-16 The rear of the G-16 in June 1959. ©2009 Gammel Associates
S-16 Slim Cox serving as engineer of the S-16 in June 1959. ©2009 Gammel Associates
G-16 Another view of passengers riding the G-16 in June 1959. ©2009 Gammel Associates
G-16 Engineer Clarence Holland driving the G-16 in June 1959. ©2009 Gammel Associates
S-16 Engineer Slim Cox driving the S-16 entering the Duck Pond Turnaround in June 1959. Notice that the train is entering the turnaround loop to the left rather than to the right as it does today. ©2009 Gammel Associates
Truss Bridge A set of views of the Truss Bridge from 1967 when it was beside the University Drive bridge. ©2009 Gammel Associates
Truss Bridge
Truss Bridge
Truss Bridge

Forest Park Miniature Railroad
1700 Colonial Parkway
Fort Worth, Texas 76101
817-336-3328
fpmt@fpmt.us

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