Forest Park Miniature Railroad



Engine 104
Figure 1: This photo appeared in Texas on 11 September 1960 with the caption: “This replica of an old-fashioned wood-burning steam locomotive is always jammed with riders. It doesn’t burn wood as did its predecessor, but is powered by a gasoline motor.” The 1865 Eagle is outbound to the Truss Bridge with its smoker, a device for creating smoke, fully open. When activated, the smoker created a dynamic image of the gasoline-powered 1865 Eagle chuffing smoke on its approach to the Truss Bridge. The engineer is Slim Cox. It also appeared in the article “The Tiny T & P” in Texas & Pacific Topics for September-October 1959.

Miniature Reflections

Part One

by

Theo Gammel
©Gammel Associates

In 1955, at the urging of his son Gene Hames[1], W. H. "Bill" Hames[2] decided to add a miniature railroad to the already existing rides in Forest Park[3] even though a train, running on a quarter-mile circular track, already existed in Forest Park as part of the amusement rides operating there. A proposal was given to the Fort Worth Park Board at its regular Thursday meeting on 28 June 1956 to build such a train through Forest and Trinity Parks from the Fort Worth Zoo parking lot just off University Drive (now the Fort Worth Zoo employee parking lot) to the West Seventh Street entrance of Trinity Park and around the Fort Worth Botanic Garden after passing through a tunnel under University Drive covering a route of between four and five miles. Hamm Hittson, director of the Fort Worth Park Department, was directed by the park board to make a feasibility study of this proposal. Hittson delivered the feasibility study to the park board a year later. Unfortunately, Bill Hames became ill at this time from complications relating to his diabetes[4] , and installation of the Forest Park Miniature Railroad was delayed for over a year. Hames recovered, and the Park Board eventually announced its approval for a miniature railroad to run from the parking lot of the Fort Worth Zoo to the Botanic Garden vista just east of University Drive to the Duck Pond in Trinity Park at its Thursday meeting on 1 November 1958. Going to the West Seventh Street entrance of Trinity Park and to the Fort Worth Botanic Garden through a tunnel under University Drive was not considered feasible.

FPMRR Construction
Figure 2: This photo appeared in the Fort Worth Press (17 April 1959) with the caption: "Tracks for a miniature railroad that will carry passengers be-tween the Trinity Park duck pond and Forest Park Zoo are being put down across a park road--which will then get a flashing warning signal to warn motorists. The miniature railroad will be opened this summer." The individual with the carpenter's apron is Theo Ledel; the person on his knees is Lloyd Sherwood, a long time employee of Bill Hames Shows, Inc. Photo ©Fort Worth Press 1959.

Although the announced approval for a miniature railroad in Forest and Trinity Parks was made on 1 November 1959, approval had been made earlier with the proposed signing of a four-way right-of-way agreement with the Texas and Pacific Railway Company, Grace Montague (to cross the land she leased from the T&P), the City of Fort Worth, and W. H. Hames, Inc. on 1 September 1958 which all parties save the City of Fort Worth signed. The City of Fort Worth did not sign this version of the right-of-way agreement because the City Council preferred a concession contract signed with an individual rather than a corporation. This delayed the signing of this rewritten agreement until 28 November 1958 when the four parties (the Texas and Pacific Railway Company, Grace Montague, the City of Fort Worth, and W. H. Hames, as an individual) signed on that day. Thomas McCann[5], then mayor of Fort Worth, signed this agreement as the representative of the City of Fort Worth, Texas. At the time of this agreement, the Texas and Pacific Railway owned that part of Trinity Park between the Trinity Park Creek and the Lancaster Street Bridge where the Fort Worth and Western trestle now crosses Trinity Park. The City of Fort Worth acquired this section of what is now Trinity Park at the time the US Corps of Engineers re-channeled the Clear Fork of the Trinity River through Fort Worth in 1972.

Official notification of approval for the proposed Forest Park Miniature Railroad with a route from the Fort Worth Zoo parking lot to the Trinity Park Duck Pond came in a letter from Ham Hittson, Fort Worth Director of Parks, to W. H. Hames (Hittson, 5 November 1958). In his notification letter, Hittson stated that both the “Park Board and the public are very anxious for this installation to be completed by you at the earliest date – by next Easter Sunday if at all possible.” This letter also set the price of a Forest Park Miniature Railroad ticket at $0.35 per person, round-trip, for passengers of all ages[6]. If anything, Hittson underestimated the interest in this train.

The planning stage of the Forest Park Miniature Railroad went into operation when unofficial word of approval for the miniature train through Forest and Trinity Parks was received with the signing of the first four-way right-of-way agreement on 1 September 1959. Theo Ledel[7], W. H. Hames son-in-law contacted the Miniature Train Company of Rensselaer, Indiana for information on the G-16 trains they built and sold as well as various vendors concerning bids on rail, spikes, ties, ballast, etc. While this was taking place, the Allen Herschell Company, Inc. of North Tonawanda, New York bought the Miniature Train Company of Rensselaer, Indiana so the first order for engines, rolling stock, rail, and equipment was made on 6 November 1958 to the Allan Herschell Company, Inc. and the Miniature Train Division (the name of the combined company) for a G-16 “diesel” train. This order was for two “diesel” A units, seven center coaches, one observation coach, five 12lb. track switches, with controls, and eight crossing signals complete with automatic controls. The engines and coaches were to be painted in Texas and Pacific colors (blue and silver) and have left hand openings; that is, they were to be entered on the left side of the train when passengers boarded. The number of coaches ordered allowed a capacity of ninety-six passengers. The delivery date for this order was 15 January 1959 via railroad freight (appropriately carried by the Texas and Pacific Railway). On 18 December 1958, an 1865 “steam” train (an S-16) was ordered with Texas and Pacific Railway markings although it was painted to resemble wooden passenger coaches. This train consisted of an 1865 engine with tender, a B unit disguised as a mail and baggage car, five center coaches, one observation coach, and two switches with controls. With the coaches ordered, the 1865 Eagle had a capacity of seventy-two passengers. The switches were for a double track at the Forest Park Depot at its original location next to the Fort Worth Zoo parking lot so more than one train could be loaded at the same time and three trains could be run simultaneously if so desired. The delivery date for this order was 3 March 1959.

1865 Eagle
Figure 3: The 1865 Eagle parked on the approach to the Truss Bridge in June 1959. The road in the background will eventually be paved and become an extension of Colonial Parkway. The baggage car behind the tender is the B unit. This part of the route of the Forest Park Miniature Railroad no longer exists since the Clear Fork of the Trinity River was re-channeled by the US Corps of Engineers in 1972. Photo ©W. D. Smith-Commercial Photographer 1959.

In the same order, the left-hand openings were changed to right-hand openings by Duncan Finlayson, service manager of the Allan Herschell Company, for this train and the “diesel” train ordered on 6 November 1958. Theo Ledel changed this back to left-hand openings before the orders for the Texas Eagle and the 1865 Eagle were confirmed on 8 April 1959. The delivery date had already been changed to early June 1959 at the request of Forest Park Rides, Inc. The Easter completion date for the train was not met.

Each of the S-16 coaches was named for an older member of the Hames family and bore a plaque on the right-hand side with the name. The 1865 engine itself was named for Bill Hames and bore a plaque to that effect.

1865 Coaches[8]
Bill Hames Special Bill Hames 1865 Engine
Frank Special Frank Hames Son of Bill Hames
Gene Special Gene Hames Son of Bill Hames
Junior Special Gene Ledel Grandson of Bill Hames
Mary Helen Special Mary Helen Hames Brown[9] Daughter of Bill Hames
Pearl Special Pearl Hames Ledel Daughter of Bill Hames
Theo Special Theo Ledel Son-in-Law of Bill Hames

Although Gene Ledel’s coach was named Junior, he was not really a junior. His initials were T. G., the same as his father, Theo Ledel. In the case of Gene Ledel, the initials stood for Theodore Gene; in the case of his father, the initials stood for Theodor Gammel. Theo Ledel’s first name retained the Swedish spelling of his Father’s name, Theodor Julius Ledel. Everyone assumed that Gene Ledel was named for his father because of the identical initials, and many of his family members referred to him as Junior because of his initials.

The G-16 coaches were named for the younger members of the Hames family, and each also bore a plaque on the right-hand side with its name on it.

Modern Coaches
Angela Special Angela Ledel Goodell Great-Granddaughter of Bill Hames
David Special David Ledel Great-Grandson of Bill Hames
Kathy Special Kathy Ledel Henley Great-Granddaughter of Bill Hames
Mike Special Mike Hames Grandson of Bill Hames
Pam Special Pam Hames Price Daughter of Bill Hames
Paris Special Paris Hames Granddaughter of Bill Hames
Pat Special Patrick Ledel[10] Great-Grandson of Bill Hames
Ted Special Ted Ledel Great-Grandson of Bill Hames

Pam Price is Bill Hames fifth and youngest child who was born at the time his oldest great-grandchildren were born. Because she was the same generation as his grandchildren and great-grandchildren, she was included with those her age when naming the modern coaches. Mike Hames is the youngest child of Frank Hames; Paris Hames is the eldest daughter of Gene Hames. The Ledels listed in the Modern Coaches table above are all children of Gene Ledel, grandchildren of Theo Ledel, and great-grandchildren of Bill Hames as of 1959 when the coaches were named. Bill Hames and Theo Ledel chose the names for all the Forest Park Miniature Railroad coaches.

On 8 December 1958, Theo Ledel ordered fifty-six tons of 12 lb. rail (250 feet per ton), 1120 splice bars, twenty kegs of spikes (3/8” X 2 ˝”) and 4200 nuts and bolts for the splice plates (four nuts and bolts per plate) from the Colorado Iron and Steel Company; these were to be delivered to the Lancaster Shop Team Track by the Texas and Pacific Railway. The first order for ties (8400 of them) also went in on 8 December 1958 to E. F. Gray of The Mill in Ada, Oklahoma. These ties were 4” X 4” X 30” in size. An additional order to The Mill for 1500 ties was made on 18 December 1958.

Baggage and Mail Car
Figure 4: The S-16 B unit disguised as a mail and baggage car. Inspite its appearance, it was a complete engine with a complete set of controls and a seat for an engineer in the same arrangement as the G-16 "diesel" engines. Photo ©W. D. Smith-Commercial Photographer 1959.

After Gene Ledel[11] had walked several potential routes for the Forest Park Miniature Railroad through Forest and Trinity Parks, Theo Ledel made the official survey of the original route[12] for this railroad throughout December 1958 from the information gathered by Gene Ledel. The route was laid so that only one tree had to be removed in order to complete the route which is why it zigzags in and out of trees every now and then along the right-of-way. Only one tree, at the Trinity Park Duck Pond turnaround, could not be avoided no matter how that circle was routed. Missing one tree put the right-of-way through a different tree. Whatever right-of-way was used for the Trinity Park turnaround, at least one tree was always in the way so one tree had to be cut down to make room for the turnaround at the Duck Pond. From survey to construction took from December 1958 to May 1959 with every bridge being built in place save for the truss bridge across the Clear Fork of the Trinity River beside the University Drive Bridge.

Truss Bridge under Construction
Figure 5: This photo appeared in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram on 4 March 1959 with the caption "A BIG PROBLEM IN MINIATURE--Workmen sweated out for several hours Tuesday the job of getting this miniature span across the Trinity River at University Dr. It's the river bridge for the new miniature railroad being installed in Forest and Trinity Parks. The tiny railroad is believed to be the longest of its kind in America." Photo ©Fort Worth Star-Telegram 1959.

The truss Bridge (see Figure 5) across the Clear Fork of the Trinity River was built (and built very well) in Fort Worth, Texas by the Maxwell Steel Division of Creamer Industries from parts forged by Jones and Laughlin of Pennsylvania and the Inland Steel Corporation of Delaware in 1959. The imbroglios of both companies can be seen on the struts of this bridge. On 3 March 1959, the Truss Bridge was loaded onto a semi-trailer and driven from the Maxwell Steel Division of Creamer Industries to its original location next to the University Drive Bridge across the Clear Fork of the Trinity River. The only trouble experienced during the installation of this bridge was moving it beneath the University Drive Bridge down the south bank of the Clear Fork. The Truss bridge lacked one-half inch clearing the bottom of the University Drive Bridge. The clearance problem was solved by partially deflating the truck tires so it would fit under the University Drive Bridge. Once it was as close as possible to its support piers, it was lifted onto those piers over the Clear Fork of the Trinity River on the after-noon of 3 March 1959 by a large crane. From end to end, the Truss Bridge is ninety feet long, not counting the approaches; with the north and south approaches, this bridge was 175 feet in length, south abutment to north abutment.

The Truss Bridge is still in use on the current Forest Park Miniature Railroad right-of-way. It is the first bridge crossed by the train as it leaves the Forest Park Depot heading north to Trinity Park and covers its original span of ninety feet plus an additional span of forty-one feet on the south approach and a span of forty-four feet on the north approach, The truss portion of this bridge covers only the Clear Fork Oxbow water-edge to water-edge. The total length of this bridge is still 175 feet, south abutment to north abutment, as it was when it was originally installed next to the University Drive Bridge.

There were four more bridges on the original right-of-way—a short concrete span over a culvert before what is now Colonial Parkway, the North Bridge (sixteen feet one inch), the South Bridge (fifteen feet eleven inches), and the Draw Bridge (sixty feet). The North and South Bridges were named for being north and south of the playground in Trinity Park. The Draw Bridge crosses the Trinity Park Creek before the Forest Park Miniature Railroad right-of-way passes under the Fort Worth and Western Railroad trestle in far Trinity Park. Theo Ledel built the culvert span, the North Bridge, and the South Bridge during installation of the Forest Park Miniature Railroad. The South Bridge was finished 27 February 1959. The North Bridge was finished on 28 February 1959. The Draw Bridge was built during late March and early April 1959 from parts fabricated by the Thornton Steel Corporation and was finished (track laid across the bridge) on 10 April 1959.

Like the transcontinental railroad, the Forest Park Miniature Railroad also set a record for the most track laid in one day. Unlike the transcontinental railroad, it was not ten miles of track; rather, it was the most track laid in one day on the Forest Park Miniature Railroad—210 feet on 2 April 1959. That may not sound like a long distance, but I have done road work on the right-of-way of the Forest Park Miniature Railroad (replacing ties, driving spikes, gauging track) in the heat of a Texas summer, and that is a great deal of track. I have come to appreciate those iron men who laid ten miles of track on the Central Pacific Railroad in one day (28 April 1869 at Promontory Mountain in Utah). Working sunup to sunset through hot desert summers and cold mountain winters was a remarkable feat. Doing roadwork on the Forest Park Miniature Railroad, summer or winter, has been enough for me.

With the last of the track laid on 28 May 1959, a small ceremony occurred at the Duck Pond in Trinity Park where gold and silver spikes were driven to commemorate the right-of-way’s completion as was done at the completion of the transcontinental railroad. These were not true gold and silver spikes, but spikes painted gold and silver. Present at this ceremony was Bill Hames, Theo Ledel, Pearl Hames Ledel (daughter of Bill Hames), Gene Ledel (grandson of Bill Hames), David Ledel (great-grandson of Bill Hames), Kathy Ledel Henley (great-granddaughter of Bill Hames). David Ledel and Kathy Henley drove the spikes at the ceremony with some help from the adults present. Unfortunately, these spikes were lost when the right-of-way was re-laid in 1973 to accommodate the wider gauge of the C. P. Huntington trains the Forest Park Miniature Railroad has used since 1973. G-16s and S-16s were sixteen-inch gauge while the C. P. Huntingtons are twenty-four inch gauge.

The G-16 ordered in November 1958 and the S-16 ordered in December 1958 ar-rived at the Lancaster Shop Team Track and was trucked to the Forest Park Depot on the afternoon of 6 June 1959. A three-feet by six-feet piece of plywood was used as a chute between the truck and the track to unload the S-16 engine, one “diesel” engine, and one modern coach with three men on each side to control the descent to the track and to rail each piece as it left the plywood for the right-of-way. Unfortunately, this turned out not to be a day to unload anything with heavy rain starting around 4:00 pm. The pieces already on the rail were pushed into the storage shed, and operations were called off until 7 June 1959 when the remainder of the engines and rolling stock were unloaded and put on the rail.

Although the right-of-way was finished and all railroad equipment was on the rail and ready, the Forest Park Miniature Railroad did not open to the public until Friday, 12 June 1959. The first train run on the Forest Park Miniature Railroad right-of-way was engineered by Duncan Finlayson (sent to Fort Worth, Texas by the Allan Herschell Company to aid in the installation of the Forest Park Miniature Railroad) with Theo Ledel, manager of the Forest Park Miniature Railroad, and Lloyd Sherwood, an engineer of the Forest Park Miniature Railroad, as passengers on 10 June 1959. This train consisted of two “diesel’ A units and one modern coach. After this test run, the rest of the modern coaches were cou-pled to the test train. Both the G-16 and the S-16 were then filled with sandbags to simulate passenger weight and run for the rest of the day. That continued through Thursday, 11 June 1959 to test the equipment and the right-of-way. Both were found to be in excellent condition.

Rail Traffic On Upswing--in Forest Park!
Figure 6: This photo appeared in the Fort Worth Press on 14 June 1959 with the caption: "Rail Traffic On Upswing--in Forest Park! It looked like the peak period at Grand Central Station--the way young and old were rushing for trains! But it was the rush hour yesterday afternoon in Forest Park, where Bill Hames has just begun operating streamlined and old-fashioned trains over what is believed to be the longest miniature train track--2 1/2 miles--in the world. This streamliner carries 100 kids; the old-fashioned model, 60. Passengers lined up for a block yesterday. --Press Staff Photo by Bob Bogen." The engineer is Lloyd Sherwood. Photo ©Fort Worth Press 1959.

When the Forest Park Miniature Railroad opened to the public on Friday, 12 June 1959, it was the beginning of a human deluge. On Friday (opening day), 1500 passengers rode the Texas Eagle and the 1865 Eagle; on Saturday, 13 June 1959, 4000 passengers rode the Texas Eagle and the 1865 Eagle; on Sunday, 14 June 1959, 5000 passengers rode the Texas Eagle and 1865 Eagle with 3000 passengers having their tickets refunded because there was no room for them on the trains from 9:00 a. m. to late afternoon[13]. There was even a major traffic jam in Forest Park so many people wished to ride on one of the trains. Those wishing to board the train in Trinity Park could find no seats available from 9 a. m. to late afternoon. The five-mile round trip took thirty minutes at twelve miles per hour with both the Texas Eagle and the 1865 Eagle running simultaneously.

Truss Bridge under Construction
Figure 7: This photo appeared in the article "The Tiny T&P" in Texas & Pacific Railway Topics (September-October 1959) with the caption: "Tiny T&P owner, W. H. (Bill) Hames (L), checks on operations of the line's streamliner with his operating head and son-in-law, T. G. (Theo) Ledel, while engineer R. R. (Bob) Davis sits ready and waiting to pull out for another 5-miles and 30-minutes trip."

Along the right-of-way through Forest and Trinity Parks were twenty-five crossbuck signs to warn drivers of grade crossings with four being bell-ringing, flasher-light signals marking the busiest crossings. When the Forest Park Miniature Railroad opened, only three sets of the bell ringing, flasher-light signals were installed. The fourth grade crossing (the road that would become an extension of Colonial Parkway) had a flagman until the crossing signals could be completely installed. This had unfortunate consequences on 21 June 1959 when a driver mistook the flagman’s signal as permission to come ahead instead of stopping for an oncoming train. He stalled his car on the grade crossing just as the Texas Eagle reached the street. The right front fender of the car was damaged. The front end of the first “diesel” was bent; both engines and two passenger coaches jumped the rail as a result of the collision, and the couplings on all the coaches were bent. The Texas Eagle was put back on the rail and removed from service until repairs could be made. This did not take long as replacement parts were flown by air express from Buffalo, New York on Monday morning (22 June 1959). Repairs were made the same morning, and the Texas Eagle returned to service that afternoon.

Truss Bridge under Construction
Figure 8: The unfortunate occurrence of 21 June 1959 was caught on film by W. D. Smith. The gentleman in the dark suit with the pained expression is the eighteen-year-old driver of the car. The police did not issue any tickets. Photo ©W. D. Smith-Commercial Photographer 1959.

Only two other difficulties came about in the early weeks of operation for the Forest Park Miniature Railroad. The first was that batteries in the engines were cracking and melting and had to be replaced. Duncan Finlayson was puzzled by this as no Herschell train had this problem anywhere else. When asked where the other Herschell trains operated, Finlayson replied New England. The difference between New England summers and Texas summers was pointed out to him. The solution was moving the battery in each engine to the opposite end of the engine from the motor and putting much longer leads between the battery and the motor. That ended the problem with the batteries. The second difficulty was more easily fixed. Two more Modern Eagles (each with a capacity of ninety-six passengers) were ordered from Allan Herschell to accommodate the number of passengers faced by the Forest Park Miniature Railroad. These came with the relocation of the battery already installed.


List of References

Agreement Between the Texas and Pacific Company, Grace Montague, the City of Fort Worth, W. H. Hames (1 September 1958).

Brown, Buster. Personal interview. 15 May 1996.

"City Parks Will Build Longest Miniature Train," Fort Worth Press (5 November 1958).

"Forest Park Concession Operator Granted Extension of Franchise," Fort Worth Star-Telegram (29 June 1956).

"Forest Park Train Due To Roll Again Today." Fort Worth Star-Telegram (22 June 1959).

Goolsby, Patricia. Personal interview. 13 December 2007.

Gordon, Jack. "10,500 Shove to Ride New Park Trains." Fort Worth Press (15 June 1959).

Hall, William M. "Tiny T & P." Texas (11 September 1960).

Hames, Gene. Personal interview. 29 November 1996.

Hames, Raymond. Personal interview. 15 August 1996.

Henley, Kathy. Personal interview. 19 December 1996.

Hittson, Ham. "To W. H. Hames." 5 November 1958.

Ledel, David. Personal interview. 15 December 1996.

Ledel, Gene. Personal interview. 25 November 1996.

Ledel, Pearl. Personal interview. 17 June 1978.

Ledel, Theodor. Personal interview. 2 January 1980.

"Miniature Railroad Through Forest Park Being Studied," Fort Worth Star-Telegram (29 October 1957).

"Miniature Trains Jammed." Fort Worth Star-Telegram (14 June 1959).

"Proposal To Build Miniature Railroad Through Park to be Given Board." Fort Worth Star-Telegram (27 June 1956).

"The Tiny T&P." Texas & Pacific Topics 14.6 (September-October 1959): 14-16.


End Notes

[1] Eugene Jerome Hames, 1915-2001, was born in Pilot Point, Texas and died in Fort Worth, Texas. He was in the outdoor amusement business most of his life.

[2]William Henry "Bill" Hames, 1885-1960, was born in Spartanburg, South Carolina and died in Fort Worth, Texas. He lived his early adult life as a successful farmer on a farm outside Tioga, Texas before he entered the outdoor amusement business shortly after World War I.

[3] Forest Park Rides, Inc., owner and operator of the Forest Park Miniature Railroad, has been operating amusement rides in Forest Park since 1922.

[4] Bill Hames was a Type I diabetic for most of his life. He hated injections of insulin because they were painful for him. During his lifetime, there were no disposable syringes and hypodermic needles as there are today. Syringes and needles were reusable after sterilization and would become dull and painful through re-use.

[5] Thomas Alden McCann served as mayor of Fort Worth, Texas from 1957 to 1961. He died on 1 August 1996. He was eighty years old.

[6] This ticket price remained the price of a round trip on the Forest Park Miniature Railroad until 1973 when increased costs forced a price increase to $0.50 per person, round-trip, for passengers of any age.

[7] Theodor Gammel Ledel, 1901-1986, was born in Austin, Texas and died in Fort Worth, Texas. He met and went to work for W. H. Hames sometime around 1920 in Pilot Point, Texas and eloped with Pearl Hames (1909-1979), W. H. Hames' first-born child, on 8 November 1924. The two were married fifty-four years.

[8] The 1865 Eagle has another distinction besides having its engine and coaches named after older members of the Hames family. Everyone on this list was born before 1930 and has died.

[9] The "Brown" in Mary Helen Hames Brown, 1916-1998, refers to her first husband Milton Brown, considered one of the founders of Western Swing. Interestingly, after Brown died, she married and divorced Fred "Papa" Calhoun, a jazz pianist who played with Milton Brown's band, the Musical Brownies. After divorcing Calhoun, she married and divorced her third husband Bob Wills, also considered one of the founders of Western Swing. She kept the last name of her first husband all her life.

[10] Patrick Thomas Ledel, 1959-2007, was born and died in Fort Worth, Texas. He was not yet six months old when a modern Eagle coach was named for him. He worked in the outdoor amusement business for many years.

[11] Theodore Gene Ledel, 1927-2004, was born and died in Fort Worth, Texas. He worked in the outdoor amusement business all his life and operated Gene Ledel Shows, Inc. for many years.

[12] Once the train crosses the Girder Bridge to the west side of the Clear Fork of the Trinity River, it follows the original route surveyed by Theo Ledel in 1958. The route on the east side of the river had to be changed to accommodate the changes in the channel of the Clear Fork of the Trinity River made by the US Army Corps of Engineers.

[13] At this time, Forest Park Rides operated every day of the week from 10:00 a. m. to 10:00 p. m. The last train of the day usually left the Forest Park Depot at 9:30 p. m.


Forest Park Miniature Railroad
1700 Colonial Parkway
Fort Worth, Texas 76101
817-336-3328
fpmt@fpmt.us

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